FDOT Receives Financial Proposals from Four Teams for I-4 Ultimate Project

The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) announced yesterday that it received four financial proposals in response to a Request for Proposals issued by FDOT on October 11, 2013 for the I-4 Ultimate Project.  On June 5, 2013, FDOT announced a shortlist of four proposers, all of whom submitted financial proposals yesterday and technical proposals on February 12, 2014 seeking the contract to design, build, finance, operate and maintain the project.

The estimated $2 billion project, which will be developed through a public-private partnership concession agreement, includes the reconstruction of 21 miles of I-4 from west of Kirkman Road in Orange County to east of State Road 434 in Seminole County.   The project adds four tolled express lanes to I-4 while maintaining the existing free general use lanes, providing a choice to motorists. 

FDOT received financial proposals from the following shortlisted teams (listed in the order received):

  1. Ultimate Mobility Partners (InfraRed Capital Partners Limited; Fluor Enterprises, Inc.; Kiewit Infrastructure South Co.);
  2. I-4 Mobility Partners (Skanska Infrastructure Development Inc.; John Laing Investments Limited);
  3. 4wardPartners (VINCI Concessions S.A.S.; Meridiam Infrastructure I-4 Ultimate, LLC; Walsh Investors, LLC); and
  4. I-4 Development Partners LLC (Macquarie Capital Group Limited; OHL Concesiones.A.; FCC Construccion S.A.).
FDOT is reviewing the financial proposals and technical proposals and expects to make final selection of a best value proposer at a public meeting on April 23, 2014.  
 
For further information, please visit the project website at www.moving-4-ward.com.  A more detailed list of each proposer team can be found under “Project Info/Docs” on the project website.

Florida Governor Signs New P3 Bill into Law

On June 27th, Florida Governor Rick Scott signed a bill into law that gives counties, municipalities, school boards and other political subdivisions in the Sunshine State authority to enter into public-private partnership (P3) agreements for facilities that “serve a public purpose.”  The bill - HB 85 - authorizes P3s for a wide range of facilities, including education facilities, transportation facilities, water / wastewater facilities, roads, highways and bridges, healthcare facilities and sporting or cultural facilities.  The bill does not cover the Florida Department of Transportation or other Florida state agencies.

The new P3 law will go into effect on July 1, 2013 and builds on Florida’s success in using P3s for social infrastructure and landmark transportation facilities such as the Port of Miami Tunnel and the I-595 Corridor Roadway Improvements Projects.

View a full copy of the P3 bill.

Notably, the new law creates a seven-member task force that will recommend P3 guidelines, including guidelines related to the factors public entities should consider when procuring a P3 project.  The task force must submit its recommendations to the Governor, President of the Senate and Speaker of the House of Representatives by July 1, 2014.  While such guidelines will be helpful, the bill does not require the guidelines be established or for public entities to adopt the guidelines as a condition to entering into a P3 agreement.

Other highlights of the bill include the following:

  • Authorization and related guidelines for consideration of unsolicited proposals;
  • Safeguards against P3 agreements precluding the construction of additional capacity or competing facilities;
  • A requirement that private sector partners meet standards otherwise applicable to providing professional services;
  • Flexible payment and performance security requirements (e.g., letters of credit, parent company guarantees, etc.), provided that standard bonding requirements apply to all construction work (see F.S., § 255.05);
  • Either before the procurement is initiated or before the contract is awarded, public entities must perform an independent analysis of the proposed P3 and demonstrate its cost-effectiveness and overall public benefit; and
  • Public entities procuring P3s must give affected local jurisdictions notice of the project – with a copy of the project proposal – and consider any comments it receives from the local jurisdictions before entering into the P3 agreement.

Florida Department of Transportation Sets Date for I-4 Industry Forum

The Florida Department of Transportation has scheduled an industry forum for the I-4 Ultimate Project.  The forum will be held on March 4, 2013 to introduce this $2 billion+ Orlando-area project.  The project will add two managed lanes in each direction from west of Kirkman Road in Orange County to the east of SR 434 in Seminole County, a distance of 21.1 miles.  As currently contemplated by FDOT, the project includes reconstruction of 15 interchanges, 56 new bridges and 68 bridge replacements and will be procured as a public-private partnership. 

The forum is intended for all those interested in participating in the development, design, construction, financing, operations and maintenance of the project.  The forum will include a series of presentations on the project scope, procurement timeline, procurement process, traffic and revenue, and financing information for the project.  One-on-one meetings for interested proposer teams are scheduled for March 5th and 6th.  The forum and the one-on-one meetings will be held at the Rosen Centre Hotel, 9840 International Drive, Orlando, Florida.  FDOT has established a website for the project at: www.moving-4-ward.com for those seeking more information or to request a one-on-one meeting after the forum.

Transportation For America's Review of Deficient Bridges

We all know that our infrastructure is aging.  Considering how hot the issue of transportation funding (or lack thereof) has become, it is almost impossible not to see or hear something on this topic daily.  That being said, Transportation for America has provided a new way for us to fixate on the state of disrepair of our nation’s bridges – an interactive map. 

The map is color-coded and uses green to mark states that are more-or-less maintaining their bridges.  A special hats off to Florida and Nevada, which rank 50th and 51st respectively in the list of disrepair.  In contrast, the map uses a deep, ominous red – something akin to a scarlet letter - to mark states whose transportation dollars just aren’t going far enough.  Pennsylvania and Oklahoma get the dubious honor of being coded red, with 26.5% and 22.0% of their bridges being deficient respectively.

Once you have taken a look at how the states stack up against each other, you may want to click on the “Near You” button above the map.  This allows you to insert any address and locate deficient bridges within a 10-mile radius.  Depending on where you look, this can be relatively shocking.

Whether you are looking at the interactive map or using the “Near You” function, you should note that if you scroll down Transportation for America has provided a more detailed chart showing the percent of bridge traffic going over deficient bridges.  This twist on the information can be quite interesting.  For example, though California is only in 18th place on the overall list of deficient bridges, the chart shows that California has the 3rd highest rate of total bridge traffic going over deficient bridges (indicating that California’s deficient bridges are in high demand).